Live A Live Chapter Order: Which Chapter to Read First and Story Scenario Order Suggestions

live alive is a unique classic Japanese RPG, and its defining feature is clever in its simplicity: game features multiple story scenarios which you can tackle in the order of your choice. Which begs the question: in what order should you play the storiesand which chapter should you play first?

Each of Live A Live’s storylines was designed by a different famous manga artist, meaning each one has its own unique flavor. While there is a single overarching theme and narrative that ties together each of the game‘s story chapters, they are also all entirely self-contained.

On this page, we offer some suggestions for which scenario to play first And one optimal order of scenarios – although the choice is ultimately yours.

Live A Live Chapter Select: In what order should you play the stories?

Before we go any further, let’s get rid of the big question at the very top: there’s no official optimal order in which to play Live A Live’s stories. Because each scenario is self-contained, with no crossover of characters, gear, or anything else, you can tackle them in any order you choose – and ultimately you’ll only unlock the hidden final scenario by defeating the seven that are offered at the start of the game.

Each of the chapters has unique quirks, and before giving our suggestions on a play order, it’s worth listing them in case it helps you decide for yourself:

  • Prehistory is a full-fledged mini-RPG, and it will introduce you to all the Live A Live systems. A curious quirk is that, starring cavemen, there’s no traditional dialogue, just grunts and gestures. Later bosses can be difficult, but you also have the option to solve it if you get stuck.
  • Far future is a primarily story-driven experience. There are optional battles in the arcade game, but they mostly focus on the characters. In many ways, it’s a big dump – it’s not appropriate first, but it fits in well anywhere else.
  • imperial china is quite combat-focused, and it has a unique trick in that the main protagonist doesn’t level up – it’s a simpler experience. For this reason, it can be an ideal early starting point or can be used to break up heavier chapters.
  • wild west is a much shorter chapter; one of the shortest in the game. It features just a handful of battles, two playable characters, and a chapter-defining puzzle with an eight-minute time limit. His final battle can be tough, but the whole storyline is so short that you just have to change your approach, because there’s no way to grind.
  • Today is the shortest of all the chapters and can be beaten in half an hour. It’s basically a boss rush, so you better pick that up once you’re more familiar with the fight.
  • Close future plays like a more standard Japanese RPG affair, including a world map to explore.
  • Twilight of Edo in Japan is perhaps the longest chapter, with two completely different ways to play it. Whether you aim to kill the last person or sneak around to achieve your goal.

Once you have completed all seven, one final chapter, The Middle Age, will unlock. Once this has been cleared, the final storyline leading to the various endings of Live A Live is available.

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Since it’s your decision and there is no “bad” or “good” first chapter or chapter order noted, we have some general recommendations on which chapters you might start with, and some suggestions for the best possible order to play them. These are just suggestions, but after experimenting with the game, we think these commands make a lot of sense…

Which chapter should you play first?

Here are three answers for which chapter of Live A Live's stories you should read first.

If you’re just starting Live A Live, we have some general suggestions on which of the seven scenarios you might choose to start on. In particular, we think these three scenarios are the best chapters to choose for your very first experience with the game:

  • Prehistory looks like the chapter the developers designed to be the first – which makes sense, since it’s the oldest in the Live A Live timeline. It’s a long and relatively in-depth RPG story in its own right – but in an interesting twist, there’s no traditional dialogue – that you might like, or you might find less interesting.
  • wild west is light on combat and heavily focused on story, exploration, and small puzzles. However, there are a handful of combat encounters throughout. This makes for a shorter chapter – you can experience it in about an hour – it’s great for dipping a toe into the world of Live A Live with just enough combat to act as a decent combat tutorial. It’s worth noting that The Distant Future is structurally similar to Wild West, but we still recommend that you don’t play that one first, as it’s just not such an exciting intro.
  • imperial china probably splits the difference between the two above. It’s a meatier story than Cowboy Adventure, but simpler than Prehistory, with normal dialogue. It is also one of the most user-friendly story scenarios in terms of difficulty.

In what order should you play the scenarios?

Ultimately, the stories do eventually intertwine, but only loosely - so you can play in any order you want.

As for the rest of Live A Live – it’s less important than your first storyline, but we have some general impressions of the order in which you might tackle the story chapters:

  • Chronological order: This order allows you to approach the different stories of the game in the order in which they take place. It will be as follows:
    • Prehistory
    • imperial china
    • Twilight of Edo in Japan
    • wild west
    • Today
    • Close future
    • The distant future
  • The menu order: When you first start the game, the stories will be presented to you in an order that isn’t quite chronological, but almost seems like a story order suggestion from the developers of Live A Live. When you complete chapters, they will also appear as badges in that order. It strikes a good balance between separating longer chapters from each other, while breaking the pacing between story-driven and gameplay-driven scenarios. This is:
    • Prehistory
    • Far future
    • imperial china
    • wild west
    • Today
    • Close future
    • Twilight of Edo in Japan

Ultimately, however, the choice is and should be yours. Starting with one of our suggestions in your first chapter is a good idea – because you’re just starting out and want a natural entry point into the adventures and systems of Live A Live. Beyond that, follow your instincts, play the stories in any order you want, and keep your eyes peeled for those bits of connective tissue between each chapter…these are clues to what will happen in the later stages. Game. .

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